Go to VMS Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
May 07, 2021, 11:15:46 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News:

Virtual Machine Shop Forum  |  Machine Tool Technology  |  Questions, answers, ideas  |  Topic: Blueprint « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Blueprint  (Read 4893 times)
Ron
Admin
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 742

« on: April 13, 2008, 08:40:04 PM »

I am interested in what shops do today. Some shops I know wont machine anything without a plotted or drawn orthographic blue print. Some do everything with solids modeling. What do you do or what do you see mostly happening in job shops and/or vertically integrated manufacturing?
Logged
fanelli18
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 254

« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2008, 11:36:27 AM »

I think the only solid we use is for a crossmember assembly just to show what it looks like completly assembled other than that they really skimp out on some details
your left to figure it out on your own
Logged
paul
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 46

« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2008, 01:31:45 AM »

most of the stuff we see in our shop is quick sketches drawn out on the hood of a field service truck.
Logged
ronseto
Guest
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2008, 06:39:58 PM »

Coming from a shipbuilding background as a designer, we make detailed drawings for everything. Complex assemblies are sometimes modeled in solid form to aid in visualization. Lately, everything is done by CAD 2-D and 3-D. There is much precision machining involved in building a ship. It's not just welding. In fact, building a ship is a very complex undertaking, involving every trade. Machine tools are among the largest in the world.
Logged
Rick
Guest
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2008, 12:38:09 AM »

It differs greatly from shop to shop. I still don't believe there is any true standard. I have worked in shops that had everything from sketches on napkins to full-on GD&T prints. I have worked on some that required all prints to come in a solid model.

Rick
Logged
fanelli18
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 254

« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2008, 03:54:44 PM »

Coming from a shipbuilding background as a designer, we make detailed drawings for everything. Complex assemblies are sometimes modeled in solid form to aid in visualization. Lately, everything is done by CAD 2-D and 3-D. There is much precision machining involved in building a ship. It's not just welding. In fact, building a ship is a very complex undertaking, involving every trade. Machine tools are among the largest in the world.

I watched a special on shipbuilding I think on discovery, I gotta tell ya thats pretty cool, And yes the machines are monsters, It makes our shop tools look like something you would put on your keychain.
Logged
Ron
Admin
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 742

« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2008, 10:49:20 PM »

It differs greatly from shop to shop. I still don't believe there is any true standard. I have worked in shops that had everything from sketches on napkins to full-on GD&T prints. I have worked on some that required all prints to come in a solid model.

Rick
This reminds me of a survey we did back in 2000 paid for by the US Department of labor. As a side product of the survey we got some info that may be of interest.
Read my comments at the bottom of this page
http://www.jjjtrain.com/vms/cnc_cad-cam/cnc_cad-cam_06.html

On another note, I wonder how many shops are ISO... think I'll post another survey question
Logged
fanelli18
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 254

« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2008, 03:36:12 PM »



On another note, I wonder how many shops are ISO... think I'll post another survey question

Ron I think the ISO is starting to become the standard to promote business.
Most shops I have seen or searched for in my Job hunt were ISO. Some of them that were just getting up and in the business were planning to become ISO.

Reading the results of the other survey you performed about the CAD/CAM. You mentioned on the bottom side note about shops closing their doors due too the military business bust. The one thing I noticed latley is to be successful longterm you need to be versatile and not follow the latest trends.

A famous stock broker mentioned trends in the marketplace. That following the trend will often make you poorer than when you started.
Logged
Profkanz
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 79

Teaching machining skills since 1980

« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2008, 04:54:52 PM »

In the shops that I visit in the course of my duties as a college faculty member I have seen that most older jobs that were designed ages ago are still using the original orthographic drawings.  Jobs that were designed in the solids era are mostly  3D solid models or drawings generated from models with some CAD drawings still being produced.  I have recently (last week) seen a job using fixtures to hold a forging for machining (in some cases for manual hole drilling) with CAD generated drawings.  Many CNC jobs are being quoted with a price differential based on whether or not existing program files or solid files are available.  Some shops are creating solid models of complex parts in house which they then own and keep.  For some jobs it is more efficient to create the solid model than to program by any other method.

In summary, it appears that there is little or no impetus for updating older designs probably due to the costs of doing that.  But the efficiency and benefits of solid modeling are being applied to projects now in development.
Logged
Ron
Admin
Registered Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 742

« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2008, 10:13:36 PM »

Interesting input.
I am such an orthographic visual it sometimes baffles me why solids are used at all. But too many years in the shop and on the drafting board skews my view in regards to the modern.
I use solids as a design tool if the item is complicated enough to warrant it. Otherwise I still do my drafting in rotated orhtographics using descriptive geometry rules.
What I find lacking in solids modeling is close attention to descriptive metrology such that the advantages of ANSI Y14.5 seem to be lost when the desgner uses solids. If you make engineering too easy this is what you sometimes get IMO.
Logged
warkill
Registered Member

Online Online

Posts: 32637

« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2021, 12:52:55 AM »

????137.7StrePERF????????XVII????????????HarrDekoAldoBecoXVII(196????????Maur1759AndrvitrXVII
????S900AssaMata????????NexcDula????DolcDerePUCCAllaDesiPacoMennOreaPatrHeadDiadFyodDiadPatr
XVIIInDe????DolbRoma????Vogu????????ArizVIII????????Marg????LawrNokiFeliSpliAtikTheoFlem????
JohnWoulJohnErosScooBehiDaniZoneBren????Fish????????Rond????ZoneZone????ZoneZone????52-7Happ
????????1151PeteJacq????????1960JeweCatr????????1281Carl????WaxmFred????Cafe????????????????
????????????????????KronHANSChinBookgyps????Dali????Pola????????????OlmeVOLKUSSR????Betttrac
????????NadoStefBlan????????Wind????mail????DeLoSleePlay????Sumn1708Amer????Drea????????????
????????????????????????????????XVIIAnatVasiWort????Elea????????????????????Back????????XVII
XVII????????????Deli????RitcHell????Inte????????????????????Exod????Mehl????????????????????
????????????Jose????KennEnco????MoriXIII????????????tuchkas????wwwr
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
Virtual Machine Shop Forum  |  Machine Tool Technology  |  Questions, answers, ideas  |  Topic: Blueprint « previous next »
 


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!